Monday, May 18, 2009

First Day of Math Class

So I'm taking Calculus at CCAC this summer, as well as psychology, physics, and history. I had my first Calculus class today. It started off that I was late. (stupid directions). So I got there, and after telling the teacher who I was, where I was from, and what my major was, he replied with "And you're taking Calculus??" as if Creative Writing majors couldn't be smart enough to take calculus. Sad thing is my old calc teacher said that in high school to me, too. :-\ Grrr. Then we got the syllabus. His grading system is insane. And not hard insane, the insane that is like so easy you can't believe it really exists. 85-100=A 75-84= B+ 65-74=B etc. You don't get a D until you're at 25%! If you only understand 1/4 of the material, you can still get a passing grade!!! He claims that he is a very hard grader, and that he doesn't give out 100% (it doesn't fit into the two columns they give you in the grade book). But seriously? Even if his questions are hard, how could you fail this class?! To make it better, he said that if you do badly on the first tests and start to understand it and do better on the last two and the comprehensive final, then he'll drop those grades and give you a grade for what he feels you don't understand. Then, if you're still doing badly on the tests, he'll look at your homework assignments, and if you do it well and understand it all on the homeworks, then he'll bump up your grade. He says the questions are hard, though, so people can and do fail his class. ...We spent the first ten minutes working on defining a function. We ended class by working with trig functions on a right triangle.

Blah.

But, to be fair, the teacher is really nice and funny. He may be easy, but he's a good teacher, at least.

1 comment:

Tim said...

Careful! My first calculus professor had a similar grading scale, but he really expected a lot out of us. Like, even though we all knew what a function was, we would have to be able to define it and prove it rigorously to get an A. Any holes in our arguments whatsoever, and we were docked.

All in all, I did well in that class. But I had to work for it.